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Contents

  1. Building courage by breaking boundaries
  2. Art experts who don't shy away from responsibility
  3. How I Got Over Being Shy and Embraced Talking to People I Don’t Know
  4. Discussions

Building courage by breaking boundaries

Once they have discussed what they see, students then answer the question, "What is happening? For example, while looking at The Gulf Stream , one student said, "The storm already passed and is on its way out.

You can tell because the small boat the man is on has been ripped apart and the mast is broken. No two responses will be exactly the same, but they can all be correct as long as the student can coherently defend his or her answer with details from the image. When children express their opinions based on logic and these details, they are analyzing art and using critical thinking skills. After thoughtful observation and discussion, students are abuzz with ideas.

For all of the following writing activities, they must use details from the image to support their ideas. Here are just a few of the many ways we can react to art:. Art can help students do that. During this year's commencement speech at Sarah Lawrence College, Fareed Zakaria said, "It is the act of writing that forces me to think through them [ideas] and sort them out. How have you used the arts to inspire creative thinking in your students? Please tell us about it in the comments. Get the best of Edutopia in your inbox each week. Step 1: Observe Asking students to look carefully and observe the image is fundamental to deep, thoughtful writing.

Look for images with: Many details: If it is a simple image, there's not much to analyze. Characters: There should be people or animals in the image to write about. Colors: Find colors that convey a mood. Spatial relationships: How do the background and foreground relate? Try these questions: What shapes do you see?

Do they remind you of anything? What colors do you see? How do those colors make you feel? What patterns do you see? How are they made? Do you see any unusual textures? What do they represent? What is the focal point of the image? How did the artist bring your attention to the focal point? How did the artist create the illusion of space in the image? If you were living in the picture and could look all around you, what would you see? If you were living in the picture, what would you smell? What would you hear? Step 2: Make Inferences by Analyzing Art Once they have discussed what they see, students then answer the question, "What is happening?

Here are some tips to model a mature conversation about art: Give adequate wait time. We are often so rushed that we don't give children time to think and reflect. Ask students to listen to, think about, and react to the ideas of others. Your questions should be short and to the point.

Art experts who don't shy away from responsibility

Highlight specific details to look at while analyzing art characters, facial expressions, objects, time of day, weather, colors, etc. Explain literal vs. Step 3: Create After thoughtful observation and discussion, students are abuzz with ideas. Here are just a few of the many ways we can react to art: For Younger Students: Locate and describe shapes and patterns.

Describe time of day and mood of scene. Describe a character in detail with a character sketch. Characters may be people, animals, or inanimate objects. Tony Rehor. Vision Board. Peter Adams.

How I Got Over Being Shy and Embraced Talking to People I Don’t Know

Jurgen Wolff. Improve Sales in 60 Minutes: Storytelling Guide. Nadja Petranovskaja.

20 Questions About Being An Artist - Starving Artist Tag

Tiffany Williams. Tony Gray. Cool Water. Denise Meridith. Pink Conversation Starters. Book Habits. Get a Clue! Snag them don't nag them!

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A short guide to cheaters and how to catch them. A Ronk. John Nanto. Do You Matter? Robert Brunner. Pen Drawing : An Illustrated Treatise. Charles Maginnis. Unasked Questions Are Foolish Ones. Terry J. The Miracle of the Artist's Date. Julia Cameron.

Pam Terry. Be My Best Boss: 11 management tips from your employees. Florian Borgeat. The Language of Art.

Discussions

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Lily McNeil. Art and Culture. Clement Greenberg. The Artist's Mentor. Ian Jackman. Phoebe Livingston. Ann Blockley.